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J Pers Soc Psychol. 2007 Jan;92(1):119-35.

What do you learn about someone over time? The relationship between length of acquaintance and consensus and self-other agreement in judgments of personality.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. jbiesanz@psych.ubc.ca

Abstract

Theory and research examining length of acquaintance and consensus among personality judgments have predominantly examined each dimension of personality separately. In L. J. Cronbach's (1955) terminology, this trait-centered approach combines consensus on elevation, differential elevation, and differential accuracy in personality judgments. The current article extends D. A. Kenny's (1991, 1994) weighted average model (WAM)--a theoretical model of the factors that influence agreement among personality judgments--to separate out two of Cronbach's components of consensus: stereotype accuracy and differential accuracy. Consistent with the predictions based on the WAM, as length of acquaintance increased, self-other agreement and consensus differential accuracy increased, stereotype accuracy decreased, and trait-level or raw profile correlations generally remained unchanged. Discussion focuses on the conditions under which a relationship between length of acquaintance and consensus and self-other agreement among personality evaluations emerges and how impressions change over time.

PMID:
17201547
DOI:
10.1037/0022-3514.92.1.119
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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