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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Mar;92(3):865-72. Epub 2007 Jan 2.

Effect of calorie restriction with or without exercise on body composition and fat distribution.

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1
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, 6400 Perkins Road, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70808, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

There is debate over the independent and combined effects of dieting and increased physical activity on improving metabolic risk factors (body composition and fat distribution).

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of the study was to conduct a randomized, controlled trial (CALERIE) to test the effect of a 25% energy deficit by diet alone or diet plus exercise for 6 months on body composition and fat distribution.

DESIGN:

This was a randomized, controlled trial.

SETTING:

The study was conducted at an institutional research center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Thirty-five of 36 overweight but otherwise healthy participants (16 males, 19 females) completed the study.

INTERVENTION:

Participants were randomized to either control (healthy weight maintenance diet, n = 11), caloric restriction (CR; 25% reduction in energy intake, n = 12), or caloric restriction plus exercise (CR+EX; 12.5% reduction in energy intake + 12.5% increase in exercise energy expenditure, n = 12) for 6 months.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Changes in body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and changes in abdominal fat distribution by multislice computed tomography were measured.

RESULTS:

The calculated energy deficit across the intervention was not different between CR and CR+EX. Participants lost approximately 10% of body weight (CR: - 8.3 +/- 0.8, CR+EX: - 8.1 +/- 0.8 kg, P = 1.00), approximately 24% of fat mass (CR: - 5.8 +/- 0.6, CR+EX: - 6.4 +/- 0.6 kg, P = 0.99), and 27% of abdominal visceral fat (CR: 0.9 +/- 0.2, CR+EX: 0.8 +/- 0.2 kg, P = 1.00). Both whole-body and abdominal fat distribution were not altered by the intervention.

CONCLUSION:

Exercise plays an equivalent role to CR in terms of energy balance; however, it can also improve aerobic fitness, which has other important cardiovascular and metabolic implications.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00099151.

PMID:
17200169
PMCID:
PMC2692618
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2006-2184
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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