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J Infect. 2007 Jun;54(6):539-44. Epub 2007 Jan 2.

Oral step-down therapy is comparable to intravenous therapy for Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis.

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1
Infectious Disease Section, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We hypothesized that regimens with an early switch to oral antibiotics are as effective as prolonged parenteral regimens for staphylococcal osteomyelitis.

METHODS:

We retrospectively reviewed records of adult patients with osteomyelitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus as determined by sterile site cultures, who had at least 6 months of follow-up post-therapy. The population was divided into two treatment groups: (1) an intravenous group (i.v.) that received > or = 4 weeks of parenteral therapy, and (2) a switch group that received < 4 weeks of intravenous followed by oral therapy.

RESULTS:

A total of 72 patients (36 in each group) were identified with groups evenly matched for demographic and clinical characteristics. The overall apparent cure rate was 74%; 69% for the i.v. group and 78% for the switch group (P=0.59). Apparent cure rates were similar regardless of duration of intravenous therapy: 83% < 2 weeks, 72% 2-4 weeks, 75% 4-6 weeks and 66% > or = 6 weeks (P=0.68). Among the 39 patients who received rifampin-based combinations, those treated simultaneously with vancomycin and rifampin did significantly worse than those who received other rifampin combinations (P<0.02). Overall, MRSA infections responded poorly compared to MSSA (65% apparently cured versus 83%). However, 11/14 (79%) MRSA patients who received rifampin combinations, other than vancomycin and rifampin simultaneously, were apparently cured.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall outcomes did not differ significantly between i.v. and switch groups. Given the markedly lower costs and ease of administration, prolonged oral regimens after initial intravenous therapy may be a preferred regimen for staphylococcal osteomyelitis.

PMID:
17198732
DOI:
10.1016/j.jinf.2006.11.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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