Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuron. 2007 Jan 4;53(1):65-77.

Vesicular glutamate transport at a central synapse limits the acuity of visual perception in zebrafish.

Author information

1
University of California, San Francisco, Department of Physiology, Program in Neuroscience, 1550 4th Street, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.

Abstract

The neural circuitry that constrains visual acuity in the CNS has not been experimentally identified. We show here that zebrafish blumenkohl (blu) mutants are impaired in resolving rapid movements and fine spatial detail. The blu gene encodes a vesicular glutamate transporter expressed by retinal ganglion cells. Mutant retinotectal synapses release less glutamate, per vesicle and per terminal, and fatigue more quickly than wild-type in response to high-frequency stimulation. In addition, mutant axons arborize more extensively, thus increasing the number of synaptic terminals and effectively normalizing the combined input to postsynaptic cells in the tectum. This presumably homeostatic response results in larger receptive fields of tectal cells and a degradation of the retinotopic map. As predicted, mutants have a selective deficit in the capture of small prey objects, a behavior dependent on the tectum. Our studies successfully link the disruption of a synaptic protein to complex changes in neural circuitry and behavior.

PMID:
17196531
PMCID:
PMC1828615
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2006.12.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center