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J Neurol Sci. 2007 Jan 31;252(2):106-12. Epub 2006 Dec 26.

Disease progression in vascular cognitive impairment: cognitive, functional and behavioural outcomes in the Consortium to Investigate Vascular Impairment of Cognition (CIVIC) cohort study.

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1
Dalhousie University, Canada. kenneth.rockwood@dal.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Empirical studies to clarify the outcomes in Vascular Cognitive Impairment (VCI) are needed. We compared cognitive, functional, and behavioural outcomes in patients with VCI to patients with no cognitive impairment (NCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD).

METHODS:

Secondary analysis of the Consortium to Investigate Vascular Impairment of Cognition (CIVIC), a multi-centre Canadian memory clinic 30-month cohort study.

RESULTS:

Of 1347 patients, 938 were eligible for follow-up, of whom 239 (24.5%) were lost and 29 (3%) had died. Of the remaining 697 patients, 125 had NCI, 229 had VCI, and 343 had AD at baseline. Compared to people with NCI, of whom 20-40% showed progression based on cognitive and functional measures, those with VCI were more likely to progress (50-65%), as were people with AD (50-80%) (p<0.01). More people with VCI showed progression of affective symptoms (30%) than those with NCI (12%) or AD (15% p<0.01). Progression of impaired judgment (rated clinically) in VCI (15%) was similar to AD (11%) but more common than in NCI (4%, p<0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Most people with VCI show readily detectable progression by 30 months. Depressive symptoms were more common and more progressive in VCI than in Alzheimer's disease, whereas clinical evidence of progressive executive dysfunction was common in both AD and VCI.

PMID:
17189642
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2006.10.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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