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J Dent. 2007 May;35(5):388-97. Epub 2006 Dec 13.

Evaluation of the enamel etching capacity of six contemporary self-etching adhesives.

Author information

1
Biomaterials Laboratory, Faculty of Odontology, University of Toulouse III, Toulouse, France. gregoire@cict.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of six contemporary self-etch primers/adhesives to demineralize ground enamel by means of ultrastructural analysis of the etching surface under SEM and by spectroscopic measurement of the percentage of calcium and phosphate ions dissolved.

METHODS:

Seventy non-carious extracted human third molars were sub-divided into 2 groups of 35 teeth each. The teeth of the first group were ground to expose flat, polished enamel surfaces 3-4mm thick. The samples thus obtained were treated with six self-etch bonding systems and a phosphoric acid gel (control group). The self-etch priming agent was then eliminated and the etched enamel surface observed by SEM. From the teeth of the second group, disc-shaped specimens were made from ground enamel and subjected to application of each of the six self-etchants. Once the etching product had been rinsed off, the rinse solution was analyzed by atomic flame spectroscopy to evaluate the percentage of calcium and phosphate ions dissolved.

RESULTS:

SEM images show that AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-Pop and Xeno III, despite having a less intensive etching efficacy than phosphoric acid, gave a regular pattern over a considerable surface area and depth. iBond and One-Up Bond F gave less regular demineralization. For Clearfil SE Bond, the demineralization was ineffective. Results of the percentage of mineral loss show that Adper Prompt L-Pop and Xeno III were the most efficient self-etch products. AdheSE, iBond and One-Up Bond F, respectively exhibited decreasing demineralizing capacity. Clearfil SE Bond, however, gave low proportions of calcium and phosphate ions loss and was considered unsatisfactory.

CONCLUSION:

The action on enamel was not the same for all self-etch systems tested. The etching potential of the self-etch adhesives was lower than that of phosphoric acid but some self-etch systems, particularly those with monomers containing phosphate derivatives, gave results close to those obtained with phosphoric acid.

PMID:
17174020
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdent.2006.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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