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Biol Res Nurs. 2007 Jan;8(3):177-85.

Effects of high-intensity endurance and resistance exercise on HIV metabolic abnormalities: a pilot study.

Author information

1
University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Nursing, Department of Medical-Surgical Nursing, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. prphd@uic.edu

Abstract

The purposes of this pilot study were to examine the effects of a 16-week supervised high-intensity combined endurance and resistance exercise training program on HIV-associated metabolic abnormalities (abdominal adiposity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance) and to explore methodological issues related to the design and implementation of the research protocol in preparation for a randomized controlled trial. A one-group pretest-posttest design was used, with outcomes measured at baseline and within 1 week after the conclusion of the training program. The exercise program consisted of 16 weeks (preceded by a 2-week phase-in period) of three endurance sessions (20 min at 70%-80% of VO (2max)) and two resistance sessions per week (one set of 8-10 repetitions at 80% of one-repetition maximum on seven exercises). Outcome measures included lipid levels (total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides), visceral and subcutaneous adipose area measured by electron beam tomography, fat and lean mass of trunk and limbs measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and insulin sensitivity measured by the homeostatic model assessment. Nine participants were recruited, 5 of whom completed the intervention and had pretest and posttest data available for analyses. Aerobic capacity and strength improved over the course of the intervention. Statistically significant decreases were found for total and trunk fat mass (1,324.9 g [+/-733.6] and 992.8 g [+/-733.6], respectively). Triglycerides decreased by 59 mg/dL (+/-69.88), and insulin sensitivity decreased by 15.7% (+/-41.7%), neither of which was a statistically significant change. Results suggest that further testing of the combined exercise intervention in a randomized controlled design is warranted.

PMID:
17172316
DOI:
10.1177/1099800406295520
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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