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[Clinical and epidemiological study of multiple sclerosis in Volgograd city].

[Article in Russian]

Abstract

Descriptive and analytical study of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been first-ever carried out in population of Volgograd city, South region of Russian Federation. At the period of the study (1996-2000) the population was estimated as 814 100 adult persons. An average age-adjusted level of MS prevalence was 31.9 per 100,000, MS incidence--9.8, mortality 1,8. Thus, the city is at a moderate risk for MS, however the incidence of the disease appeared to be rather high that indicates a further increase of MS patients number in this population. The highest level of MS prevalence was registered in two districts with poor ecological characteristics and numerous industries: Krasnoarmeysky (52.4 per 100,000 persons) and Krasnooktiabrsky (46.4). An analytical case-control study included data collected from 178 pairs (73.6% female) of MS patients and controls matched for age, sex and ethnic origin. Significant differences between patients and controls were detected as follows: patients more often had blue eyes as compared to dark ones; in the patient group mother's age at birth was above 30 years; patients more often lived near chemical and/or oil factories at age before 15 years; they more often reported a presence of stress factors in the family and chronic tonsillitis. Association with other factors, including infections, nutrition, acute and chronic diseases, poisoning, traumas, family history of different diseases, contact with animals etc, has not been found. A possible association between environmental factors and features of MS course were analyzed. Living near chemical factories at age before 15 was associated with more active MS course, i.e. high frequency of progressive course, short period from MS onset to confirmed EDSS=3, short duration of first remission. The same, though less significant, influence may exert the presence of herpes infection and chronic tonsillitis at age under 15.

PMID:
17172228
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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