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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jun;61(6):769-78. Epub 2006 Dec 6.

Effect of fortified spread on homocysteine concentration in apparently healthy volunteers.

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1
TNO Quality of Life, Zeist, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effect of folic acid, vitamin B(6) and B(12) fortified spreads on the blood concentrations of these vitamins and homocysteine.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

A 6-week randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel trial carried out in a clinical research center.

SUBJECTS:

One hundred and fifty healthy volunteers (50% males).

INTERVENTIONS:

For 6 weeks, the subjects consumed the test spreads (20 g/day): containing per 20 g (1) 200 microg folic acid, 2 microg vitamin B(12) and 1 mg vitamin B(6), or (2) 400 microg folic acid, 2 microg vitamin B(12) and 1 mg vitamin B(6) or (3) no B-vitamins (control spread).

RESULTS:

The B-vitamin status increased on using the test spreads, with the largest effect on the serum folate concentration: 48% in men and 58% in women on spread 1 and 92 and 146%, respectively, on spread 2 (P-values all <0.05). The plasma homocysteine decreased in the groups treated with the fortified spreads as compared to the control group. Average decreases were for males: 0.7+/-1.5 micromol/l (6.8%) on spread 1 and 1.7+/-1.7 micromol/l (17.6%) on spread 2 and for females: 1.4+/-1.2 micromol/l (14.2%) and 2.4+/-2.0 micromol/l (23.3%), respectively (P-values all <0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Consumption of a spread fortified with folic acid, vitamin B(6) and vitamin B(12) for 6 weeks significantly increases the blood concentrations of these vitamins and significantly decreases the plasma concentration of homocysteine. Fortified staple foods like spreads can contribute to the lowering of homocysteine concentrations.

PMID:
17151589
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602570
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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