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Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56. Epub 2006 Dec 4.

Antioxidant intake, oxidative stress and inflammation among immigrant women from the Middle East living in Sweden: associations with cardiovascular risk factors.

Author information

1
Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. achraf.daryani@pubcare.uu.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Immigrant women from the Middle East have higher cardiovascular risk compared to native women. Whether low antioxidant intake, oxidative stress or inflammation contributes to risk is unknown. In a cross-sectional study of 157 randomly selected foreign-born women (Iranian and Turkish) and native women living in Sweden, we investigated antioxidant status, oxidative stress (F(2)-isoprostanes) and systemic inflammation (plasma high sensitive C-reactive protein; CRP) markers. We also investigated relationships between F(2)-isoprostanes, CRP and cardiovascular risk factors.

METHODS AND RESULT:

Dietary intake was assessed using 24-h dietary recalls repeated four times. Micronutrient intake was not consistently different between groups. Serum alpha-tocopherol, but not gamma-tocopherol levels, was lower in Turkish vs. Swedish women (P<0.05). Turkish women had the highest F(2)-isoprostane levels (P<0.05 vs. Iranian women) and CRP levels (P<0.01 vs. Swedish women and P=0.05 vs. Iranian women). In immigrants (n=97), F(2)-isoprostanes correlated positively to insulin levels (r=0.31, P<0.01), and CRP was correlated to obesity and several cardiovascular risk factors (r-values >0.21, P values <0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The role of antioxidant status is unclear, whereas signs of oxidative stress and inflammation are evident in immigrant women from Middle East, especially Turkish women. Oxidative stress and low-grade inflammation might contribute to the higher cardiovascular risk previously observed in immigrant women. Further larger studies adjusting for more potential confounders are motivated to confirm these results.

PMID:
17145175
DOI:
10.1016/j.numecd.2006.07.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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