Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2006 Dec 1;229(11):1784-9.

Management of bilateral choanal atresia in a foal.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION:

A 1-day-old Standardbred foal with a history of extreme respiratory distress after birth consistent with upper airway obstruction was evaluated. A temporary tracheostomy tube was placed by the referring veterinarian.

CLINICAL FINDINGS:

On initial examination, there was evidence of hypoxic-ischemic syndrome, secondary to perinatal asphyxia. Endoscopy revealed obstruction of both nares at the level of the choanae; a diagnosis of bilateral choanal atresia was made.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME:

The foal was anesthetized and underwent transendoscopic laser fenestration of the buccopharyngeal membranes. Three weeks after surgery, cicatricial narrowing of the choanae was apparent and further transendoscopic ablation was performed. Recurrent stenosis necessitated revision surgeries involving a combination of laser ablation with topical administration of mitomycin and, subsequently, a combination of radial incisions into the stenotic tissue and repeated bougienage with a cuffed endotracheal tube. The degree of stenosis decreased, and at 1 year of age, the horse was an appropriate size for its age, had choanae that were almost maximally open (> 85%), and had entered training. Mild stenosis was still evident when the horse was reexamined the following year, although there was no evidence of exercise intolerance or respiratory compromise.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Bilateral choanal atresia in a foal can be successfully treated via transendoscopic fenestration of the buccopharyngeal membranes, enabling the horse to subsequently participate in athletic activities. Secondary problems resulting from initial asphyxia and recurrent stenosis at the surgical site can be overcome but may require prolonged and extensive treatment.

PMID:
17144827
DOI:
10.2460/javma.229.11.1784
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center