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Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2007 Jan;20(1):8-12.

The genetics of bipolar affective disorder.

Author information

1
MRC SGDP Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Camberwell, London, UK. A.Farmer@iop.kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Molecular genetic studies of bipolar affective disorder are beginning to show some positive and reproducible findings. The most relevant of these will be reviewed.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Obtaining consistent findings from whole genome scans has been hampered by small sample sizes and phenotypic heterogeneity. Recently, there have been concerted efforts to overcome these problems by combining data for meta-analysis. What has become increasingly clear is that several regions that are likely to contain genes contributing to bipolar affective disorder are also relevant to schizophrenia, a finding supported by recent twin data. Studies to date have implicated the D-amino acid oxidase activator complex (also known as G72/G30), disrupted in schizophrenia-1 and neuregulin, and have pointed to several promising linkage regions in which the genes have not yet been identified. In addition, there is some evidence to support the involvement of genetic variants in catechol-o-methyl transferase and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the aetiology of bipolar affective disorder.

SUMMARY:

Molecular genetic research in bipolar affective disorder may lead to the development of new diagnostic paradigms for classifying the psychoses and affective states. In addition, determining the functional significance of the susceptibility genes will pave the way for enhanced diagnostic accuracy and improved treatments.

PMID:
17143075
DOI:
10.1097/YCO.0b013e3280117722
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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