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Nature. 2006 Nov 30;444(7119):633-7.

Oncogene-induced senescence is part of the tumorigenesis barrier imposed by DNA damage checkpoints.

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1
Institute of Cancer Biology and Centre for Genotoxic Stress Research, Danish Cancer Society, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. jb@cancer.dk

Abstract

Recent studies have indicated the existence of tumorigenesis barriers that slow or inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions to neoplasia. One such barrier involves DNA replication stress, which leads to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and thereby to apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, whereas a second barrier is mediated by oncogene-induced senescence. The relationship between these two barriers, if any, has not been elucidated. Here we show that oncogene-induced senescence is associated with signs of DNA replication stress, including prematurely terminated DNA replication forks and DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibiting the DNA double-strand break response kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) suppressed the induction of senescence and in a mouse model led to increased tumour size and invasiveness. Analysis of human precancerous lesions further indicated that DNA damage and senescence markers cosegregate closely. Thus, senescence in human preneoplastic lesions is a manifestation of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress and, together with apoptosis, provides a barrier to malignant progression.

PMID:
17136093
DOI:
10.1038/nature05268
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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