Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Palliat Support Care. 2006 Dec;4(4):419-24.

Psychological intervention in fluid management.

Author information

1
Academic Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of General Hospital Psychiatry, GKT School of Medicine & Institute of Psychiatry, Weston Education Centre, London, UK. l.fisher@iop.kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hemodialysis is a palliative treatment for patients with established renal failure (ERF), and volume overload is a common problem for hemodialysis patients with low urinary output. Volume overload is thought to be mostly attributable to interdialytic fluid intake by the patient and is associated with an increased symptom burden and the development of serious medical complications. Repeated episodes of volume overload may adversely affect staff-patient relationships and the perception of care in this patient population. The aim of this case series study was to evaluate the effect and experience of a psychological intervention on interdialytic weight gain in a small group of patients.

METHODS:

Five patients were treated. The intervention involved using techniques derived from both cognitive behavior therapy and motivational interviewing. The main outcome measures were interdialytic weight gain and patient perception of the intervention.

RESULTS:

Three of the five patients reduced both mean interdialytic weight gain and the frequency with which they gained in excess of 3% of their dry weight during the intervention phase. The intervention was found to be acceptable to patients.

SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS:

The intervention was effective in helping three of the five patients to reduce both the frequency and the severity of volume overload, and two of these patients maintained this for at least 6 months post intervention. The intervention used actively engaged the patients and appeared to be experienced positively. The methods used to mobilize patient resources and optimize staff-patient relationships as vehicles of change are discussed. Both may have implications for treatment concordance and the perception of care delivered.

PMID:
17133900
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center