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Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(6):641-53.

Cost-effectiveness of healthcare-based interventions aimed at improving physical activity.

Author information

1
Orebro County Council, Department of Public Health, Orebro, Sweden. lars.hagberg@orebroll.se

Abstract

AIM:

This article aims to review current knowledge concerning the cost-effectiveness of healthcare-based interventions aimed at improving physical activity.

METHOD:

A search was performed for economic evaluations containing the terms "physical activity", "exercise", or "fitness". Cost-effectiveness for the articles found was described based on a model for evaluating interventions intended to promote physical activity.

RESULTS:

A total of 26 articles were found in the search. Nine of them concern a general population, 7 evaluated older people, and 10 studied disease-specific populations. A preventive perspective is most common, but some have a treatment perspective. Around 20 of the interventions studied were cost-effective according to their authors, but all analyses had some shortcomings in their evaluation methods.

CONCLUSION:

This review found many examples of cost-effective interventions. There is a lack of evidence for the cost-effectiveness of interventions aimed at those whose only risk factor for illness is a sedentary lifestyle. There is more evidence, although it is limited, for the cost-effectiveness of interventions aimed at high-risk groups or those who manifest poor health related to physical inactivity. Most of the evidence for cost-effectiveness is for older people and those with heart failure. Promotion of physical activity can be cost-effective with different methods and in different settings, but there remains a lack of evidence for specific methods in specific populations.

PMID:
17132598
DOI:
10.1080/14034940600627853
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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