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Carcinogenesis. 2007 May;28(5):995-9. Epub 2006 Nov 24.

Urinary 8-oxodeoxyguanosine, aflatoxin B1 exposure and hepatitis B virus infection and hepatocellular carcinoma in Taiwan.

Author information

1
Departments of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Abstract

To evaluate the role of oxidative stress and aflatoxin exposure on risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a case-control study nested within a community-based cohort was conducted in Taiwan. Baseline urine samples, collected from a total of 74 HCC cases and 290 matched controls, were used to determine by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays the level of urinary excretion of 8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage and urinary aflatoxin B(1) metabolites, a biomarker of aflatoxin exposure. Multivariate-adjusted linear regression analysis showed that urinary aflatoxin metabolites and gender were significantly associated with level of urinary 8-oxodG among controls. Moreover, after adjustments for potential confounding factors, there was a statistically significant positive dose-response relationship between levels of urinary 8-oxodG and urinary aflatoxin metabolites (P < 0.0001). However, when compared with subjects in the lowest quartile of 8-oxodG, there was a decrease in risk of HCC, with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of 0.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.3-2.0], 0.7 (95% CI 0.3-2.0) and 0.7 (95% CI 0.2-1.7) for subjects in the second, third and fourth quartile, respectively. The combination of level of urinary 8-oxodG below the median and hepatitis B virus infection resulted in an OR of 11.4 (95% CI 3.9-33.3), compared with those with urinary 8-oxodG above the median and hepatitis B virus surface antigen negative. These results suggest that elevated levels of urinary 8-oxodG may be related to increasing level of aflatoxin exposure but may also indicate enhanced repair of oxidative DNA damage and therefore lower risk of HCC.

PMID:
17127712
DOI:
10.1093/carcin/bgl234
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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