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J Antimicrob Chemother. 2007 Feb;59(2):305-8. Epub 2006 Nov 20.

In vitro activity of Citrus bergamia (bergamot) oil against clinical isolates of dermatophytes.

Author information

1
Institute of Microbiology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart. Rome, Italy. msanguinetti@rm.unicatt.it

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Recently, bergamot oil was shown to be a potent antifungal agent in vitro against clinically important Candida species. In this study, the activities of bergamot natural essence and its furocoumarin-free and distilled extracts on dermatophytes such as Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton species were investigated.

METHODS:

In vitro susceptibility testing assays on 92 clinical isolates of dermatophytes (Trichophyton mentagrophytes n = 20, Trichophyton rubrum n = 18, Trichophyton interdigitale n = 15, Trichophyton tonsurans n = 2, Microsporum canis n = 24, Microsporum gypseum n = 1 and Epidermophyton floccosum n = 12) were performed using the CLSI M38-A broth microdilution method, except for employing an inoculum of 1-3 x 10(3) cfu/mL. MICs were determined at a visual endpoint reading of 80% inhibition compared with the growth control.

RESULTS:

MICs (v/v) of all fungi ranged from 0.156% to 2.5% for the natural essence, from 0.02% to 2.5% for the distilled extract, and from 0.08% to 1.25% for the furocoumarin-free extract. The three isolates of T. tonsurans and M. gypseum exhibited the highest MIC values.

CONCLUSIONS:

Data from this study indicate that bergamot oil is active in vitro against several common species of dermatophytes, suggesting its potential use for topical treatment of dermatophytoses.

PMID:
17118937
DOI:
10.1093/jac/dkl473
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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