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Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2006 Dec;20(4):759-72, v-vi.

Skin and soft tissue infections.

Author information

1
Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Box E7-17, 2020 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. alopez1@lsuhsc.edu

Abstract

Primary skin infections (ie, pyodermas) typically are initiated by some breach in the epidermis, resulting in infection by organisms, such as Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, that normally colonize the skin. Host-associated factors, such as immunosuppression, vasculopathy, neuropathy, or decreased lymphatic drainage, may predispose to skin infection. The clinical syndromes associated with skin infections are often characteristic and are defined most simplistically by anatomic distribution. Although often mild and self-limited, skin infections can be more aggressive and involve deeper structures, including fascia and muscle. This article discusses skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, hair follicle-associated infections (ie, folliculitis, furuncles, and carbuncles) erysipelas, cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, and tenosynovitis.

Republished from

PMID:
17118289
DOI:
10.1016/j.idc.2006.09.006

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