Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Intern Med. 2006 Dec;260(6):509-16.

Intravenous polyclonal IgM-enriched immunoglobulin therapy in sepsis: a review of clinical efficacy in relation to microbiological aetiology and severity of sepsis.

Author information

1
Center for Infectious Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.norrby-teglund@ki.se

Abstract

The efficacy of intravenous polyclonal immunoglobulin (IVIG) as adjunct therapy in sepsis has long been debated. Clinical trials have yielded contradicting results, in part due to the varying study design and varying microbiological aetiologies. In most trials, the study drug has been IVIG containing polyclonal IgG. However, in recent reports, the efficacy of IgM-enriched IVIG as adjunct therapy in sepsis has been highlighted. Here we review studies on IgM-enriched IVIG therapy in sepsis and we discuss the clinical efficacy in relation to microbiological aetiology and severity of sepsis. The results suggest that patients most likely to benefit from IgM-enriched IVIG therapy are those with Gram-negative septic shock.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Health
Loading ...
Support Center