Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Metab. 2006 Nov;32(5 Pt 1):443-51.

Glucose intolerance and other cardiovascular risk factors in Haiti. Prevalence of Diabetes and Hypertension in Haiti (PREDIAH).

Author information

1
Fondation Haïtienne de Diabète et de Maladies Cardio-vasculaires (FHADIMAC), Port-au-Prince, Haïti. ejb@hainet.net

Abstract

AIMS:

To assess the prevalence of diabetes and other forms of glucose intolerance and to examine their relationship with some cardiovascular risk factors in a population representative of the capital of Haiti.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional survey was conducted in the metropolitan area of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. A population-based sample of 1620 adults was randomly selected using a two-stage cluster method, stratified in 3 age groups: 20-39, 40-64 and > or =65 years of age. Diagnosis of diabetes and pre-diabetes (IFG and IGT) was based on the 2003 Expert Committee criteria.

RESULTS:

The total response rate was 69%. The age-standardized prevalence of diabetes was 4.8% in men and 8.9% in women (P=0.0014), with, overall, 70.6% of previously diagnosed cases. Standardized for the Segi world population aged 30-64 years, its prevalence was 7.4% in men and 11.1% in women (NS). The age-standardized prevalence of pre-diabetes was 6.4% in men and 8.0% in women (NS). Hypertension was found in 48.7% in men and 46.5% in women (NS). Its rates in people > or =40 years old were 69.1% in men and 67.2% in women (NS). Abdominal obesity was strongly independently associated with diabetes and pre-diabetes in both genders. Hypertension was shown to be risk factor for pre-diabetes and total glucose intolerance in women. High education was associated with lower risk of diabetes in men.

CONCLUSION:

Prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes is moderately high in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. In people aged > or =40 years, the rate of normal blood pressure is less than 25%. Intervention programs to prevent simultaneously and manage diabetes and hypertension are imperative, and prevention strategies through lifestyle modifications should be cost-effective.

PMID:
17110899
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center