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Genomics. 1991 May;10(1):229-35.

Identification of mutations in exons 1 through 8 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene.

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1
Department of Genetics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Five different mutations have been identified in the gene causing cystic fibrosis (CF) through sequencing regions encompassing exons 1-8, including the 5' untranslated leader. Two of these apparent mutations are missense mutations, one in exon 3 (Gly to Glu at position 85; G85E) and another in exon 5 (Gly to Arg at 178; G178R), both causing significant changes in the corresponding amino acids in the encoded protein--cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Two others affect the highly conserved RNA splice junction flanking the 3' end of exons 4 and 5 (621 + 1G----T, 711 + 1G----T), resulting in a probable splicing defect. The last mutation is a single-basepair deletion in exon 4, causing a frameshift. These five mutations account for the 9 of 31 non-delta F508 CF chromosomes in our Canadian CF family collection and they are not found in any of the normal chromosomes. Three of the mutations, 621 + 1G----T, 711 + 1G----T, and G85E, are found in the French-Canadian population, with 621 + 1G----T being the most abundant (5/7). There are two other sequence variations in the CFTR gene; one of them (129G----C) is located 4 nucleotides upstream of the proposed translation initiation codon and, although present only on CF chromosomes, it is not clear whether it is a disease-causing mutation; the other (R75Q) is most likely a sequence variation within the coding region.

PMID:
1710599
DOI:
10.1016/0888-7543(91)90504-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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