Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Plast Reconstr Surg. 2006 Dec;118(7):1631-8.

Mastopexy preferences: a survey of board-certified plastic surgeons.

Author information

  • 1Department of Plastic Surgery, Nancy Lee and Perry R. Bass Advanced Plastic Surgery and Wound Healing Laboratory, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235-8820, USA. rjreditor_prs@plasticsurgery.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of this survey was to assess the current trends in mastopexy techniques and to compare satisfaction rates and complications associated with different techniques.

METHODS:

In September of 2002, a mastopexy survey was sent to 1500 members of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery; 487 complete responses were received, for a response rate of 32.5 percent. Questions elicited categorical answers, and the data were evaluated using the chi-square test and the comparison of two proportions.

RESULTS:

The inverted-T incision technique is the most popular. Satisfaction was reported to be highest with the short scar periareolar inferior pedicle reduction (or SPAIR) and Hall-Findlay techniques. Physician satisfaction was lowest with the periareolar technique. The three most common complications for all techniques were suture spitting, excess scarring, and bottoming out. The periareolar group had a greater frequency of revision (p = 0.002). The inverted-T group had a greater frequency of bottoming out (p = 0.043). The short scar group had a greater frequency of asymmetry (p = 0.008).

CONCLUSIONS:

The traditional inverted-T technique is the most popular, but the newer short scar techniques have become more popular in the last 5 years. The inverted-T incision continues to be associated with bottoming out and excess scarring. The periareolar technique has the greatest need for revision and the lowest physician satisfaction, despite its application to a greater volume of mastopexies per year.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk