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Am J Emerg Med. 2006 Nov;24(7):839-42.

Feasibility of short-term outpatient intravenous antibiotic therapy for the management of infectious conditions in pediatric patients.

Author information

1
The University of Minnesota Medical School, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota St. Paul, MN 55102, USA. krinandsam@aol.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of short-term outpatient peripheral intravenous (IV) antibiotic therapy for selected emergency department (ED) patients.

METHODS:

Retrospective analysis of pediatric ED patients presenting with infections of presumed bacterial etiology who received IV ceftriaxone and were discharged with a "capped" IV catheter and instructions to return in 24 hours for reevaluation. Outcome measures included clinical outcome at 24 hours and catheter-related complications.

RESULTS:

Twenty-nine patients met study criteria. All returned for reevaluation. In one case, a parent removed the catheter when their child reported "numbness/soreness" at the catheter site. The other 28 patients were judged to be improved, received a second dose of ceftriaxone through the original catheter, and were discharged on oral antibiotic. No adverse events related to the catheter were identified.

CONCLUSION:

Outpatient peripheral IV catheter use appears to be a feasible method for providing serial doses of parenteral antibiotic for the treatment of selected pediatric patients with infectious conditions.

PMID:
17098108
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajem.2006.03.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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