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Transplant Proc. 2006 Oct;38(8):2468-70.

Influence of degree of hepatic steatosis on graft function and postoperative complications of liver transplantation.

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1
Unit of HBP Surgery and Liver Transplantation, H. R. Carlos Haya, Malaga, Spain. perezdaga@hotmail.com

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on initial graft function of the degree of steatosis detected in the back-table biopsy, and its repercussion on the clinical results of the transplant (early posttransplant mortality and morbidity). We undertook a retrospective analysis of 300 liver transplants performed at our center from 1997 to 2004. A wedge liver biopsy was done routinely during back-table surgery (available in 294 transplants). The degree of steatosis was classified as: S0-no steatosis, 201 transplants; S1-mild steatosis (<30%), 58 transplants; S2-moderate steatosis (30% to 60%), 18 transplants; and S3-severe steatosis (>60%), 17 transplants. The ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, based on the maximum mean peak aspartate transferase in the first 72 posttransplant hours, tended to be greater as the degree of graft steatosis increased: S0, 1316; S1, 1985; S2, 2446; and S3, 2955 (P < .005 between S0 and S3). This greater initial hepatic dysfunction was correlated in the group with severe steatosis with a higher rate of severe renal failure requiring hemofiltration/hemodialysis: S0, 9%; S1, 15%; S2, 11%; and S3, 41% (P < .001); as well as with a higher early mortality (90 days): S0, 10%; S1, 21%; S2, 11%; and S3, 41% (P < .001). The Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed a significant difference (log-rank and Breslow) between the group with severe steatosis and the group with no steatosis (P = .002). We conclude that the degree of liver graft steatosis is an important determinant of I/R injury, although this progressive increase in the I/R injury with the degree of steatosis only had clinical repercussions in the case of severe steatosis.

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