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J Pediatr. 2006 Nov;149(5):611-6.

Hiv-specific secretory IgA in breast milk of HIV-positive mothers is not associated with protection against HIV transmission among breast-fed infants.

Author information

1
Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center and the Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. lk24@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To test whether secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigens in breast milk of HIV-positive women is associated with protection against HIV transmission among breast-fed infants.

STUDY DESIGN:

Nested, case-control design in which HIV-specific sIgA was measured in breast milk collected from 90 HIV-positive women enrolled in a study in Lusaka, Zambia. Milk samples were selected to include 26 HIV-positive mothers with infected infants (transmitters) and 64 mothers with uninfected infants (nontransmitters).

RESULTS:

HIV-specific sIgA was detected more often in breast milk of transmitting mothers (76.9%) than in breast milk of nontransmitting mothers (46.9%, P = .009). There were no significant associations between HIV-specific sIgA in breast milk and other maternal factors, including HIV RNA quantities in breast milk, CD4 count, and plasma RNA quantities.

CONCLUSIONS:

HIV-specific sIgA in breast milk does not appear to be a protective factor against HIV transmission among breast-fed infants.

PMID:
17095329
PMCID:
PMC2811256
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2006.06.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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