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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Feb;92(2):504-8. Epub 2006 Nov 7.

School-based intervention acutely improves insulin sensitivity and decreases inflammatory markers and body fatness in junior high school students.

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1
New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10032, USA. mr475@columbia.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) include obesity, family history, dyslipidemia, a proinflammatory state, impaired insulin secretory capacity, and insulin resistance.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 3- to 4-month school-based intervention consisting of health, nutrition, and exercise classes plus an aerobic exercise program on diabetes risk.

DESIGN:

This study was a randomized before/after controlled trial.

METHODS:

Seventy-three eighth-grade students in a predominantly Hispanic New York City public school were divided into a control group (studied twice without receiving the intervention) and an experimental group (studied before and after the intervention).

OUTCOME MEASURES:

We measured body fatness (bioelectrical impedance), insulin sensitivity, beta-cell function (insulin release in response to an iv glucose load corrected for insulin sensitivity), lipid profiles, and circulating concentrations of IL-6, C-reactive protein, adiponectin, and TNF-alpha.

RESULTS:

Participation in the intervention was associated with significant reductions in body fatness, insulin resistance, and circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein and IL-6, irrespective of somatotype on enrollment.

CONCLUSION:

Short-term school-based health, nutrition, and exercise intervention is beneficial to all students and affects multiple diabetes risk factors.

PMID:
17090635
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2006-1516
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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