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Eur Heart J. 2007 Feb;28(3):292-8. Epub 2006 Nov 7.

Association between plasma adiponectin levels and unstable coronary syndromes.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, 1216 Second Street SW, Rochester, MN 55902, USA. wolk.robert@mayo.edu

Abstract

AIMS:

Obesity is a risk factor for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The association between elevated body mass index (BMI) and ACS is independent of most traditional risk factors, suggesting a possible contribution of other body fat-related mediators. This study evaluated the association between adiponectin and ACS.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Four hundred and ninety-nine patients undergoing coronary angiography were divided into a subgroup without (n = 331) and with ACS (n = 168). In multiple regression analysis, higher adiponectin levels were independently associated with a lower risk of ACS [odds ratio (OR) = 0.61; 95% CIs: 0.46-0.81; P < 0.001]. In contrast, a higher BMI, a history of myocardial infarction, C-reactive protein, and angiographic coronary artery disease severity were all associated with a higher risk. The greatest increase in risk for ACS was seen at adiponectin levels < or = 5.5 microg/mL.

CONCLUSION:

Higher plasma adiponectin levels are independently associated with a lower risk of ACS.

PMID:
17090613
DOI:
10.1093/eurheartj/ehl361
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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