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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 Nov;54(11):1641-8.

The effects of in-home rehabilitation on task self-efficacy in mobility-impaired adults: A randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Rehabilitation Research and Development Center, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA. jon.sanford@med.va.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the effect on mobility self-efficacy of a multifactorial, individualized, occupational/physical therapy (OT/PT) intervention delivered via teletechnology or in-home visits.

DESIGN:

Randomized, clinical trial.

SETTING:

One Department of Veterans Affairs and one private rehabilitation hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

Sixty-five community-dwelling adults with new mobility devices. Thirty-three were randomized to the control or usual care group (UCG), 32 to the intervention group (IG).

INTERVENTION:

Four, once-weekly, 1-hour OT/PT sessions targeting three mobility and three transfer tasks. A therapist delivered the intervention in the traditional home setting (trad group n = 16) or remotely via teletechnology (tele group n = 16).

MEASUREMENTS:

Ten-item Likert-scale measure of mobility self-efficacy.

RESULTS:

The IG had a statistically significantly greater increase in overall self-efficacy over the study period than the UCG (mean change: IG 8.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.8-13.7; UCG 1.2, 95% CI = -5.8-8.2). Descriptively, the IG exhibited positive changes in self-efficacy for all tasks and greater positive change than the UCG on all items with the exception of getting in and out of a chair. Comparisons of the two treatment delivery methods showed a medium standardized effect size (SES) in both the tele and trad groups, although it did not reach statistical significance for the tele group (SES: tele = 0.35, 95% CI = -2.5-0.95; trad = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.06-1.14).

CONCLUSION:

A multifactorial, individualized, home-based OT/PT intervention can improve self-efficacy in mobility-impaired adults. The trend toward increased self-efficacy irrespective of the mode of rehabilitation delivery suggests that telerehabilitation can be a viable alternative to or can augment traditional in-home therapy.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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