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Mol Immunol. 2007 Mar;44(8):1977-85. Epub 2006 Nov 3.

Estradiol activates mast cells via a non-genomic estrogen receptor-alpha and calcium influx.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Child Health Research Center, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555-0366, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Allergic airway diseases are more common in females than in males during early adulthood. A relationship between female hormones and asthma prevalence and severity has been suggested, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms are not understood.

OBJECTIVE:

To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which estrogens enhance the synthesis and release of mediators of acute hypersensitivity.

METHODS:

Two mast cell/basophil cell lines (RBL-2H3 and HMC-1) and primary cultures of bone marrow derived mast cells, all of which naturally express estrogen receptor-alpha, were examined. Cells were incubated with physiological concentrations of 17-beta-estradiol with and without IgE and allergens. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and the release of beta-hexosaminidase and leukotriene C(4) were quantified.

RESULTS:

Estradiol alone induced partial release of the preformed, granular protein beta-hexosaminidase from RBL-2H3, BMMC and HMC-1, but not from BMMC derived from estrogen receptor-alpha knock-out mice. The newly synthesized LTC(4) was also released from RBL-2H3. Estradiol also enhanced IgE-induced degranulation and potentiated LTC(4) production. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration increased prior to and in parallel with mediator release. Estrogen receptor antagonists or Ca(2+) chelation inhibited these estrogenic effects.

CONCLUSION:

Binding of physiological concentrations of estradiol to a membrane estrogen receptor-alpha initiates a rapid onset and progressive influx of extracellular Ca(2+), which supports the synthesis and release of allergic mediators. Estradiol also enhances IgE-dependent mast cell activation, resulting in a shift of the allergen dose response.

PMID:
17084457
PMCID:
PMC2603032
DOI:
10.1016/j.molimm.2006.09.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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