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Psychol Bull. 2006 Nov;132(6):823-65.

Experimental disclosure and its moderators: a meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA. jfrattaroli@yahoo.com

Abstract

Disclosing information, thoughts, and feelings about personal and meaningful topics (experimental disclosure) is purported to have various health and psychological consequences (e.g., J. W. Pennebaker, 1993). Although the results of 2 small meta-analyses (P. G. Frisina, J. C. Borod, & S. J. Lepore, 2004; J. M. Smyth, 1998) suggest that experimental disclosure has a positive and significant effect, both used a fixed effects approach, limiting generalizability. Also, a plethora of studies on experimental disclosure have been completed that were not included in the previous analyses. One hundred forty-six randomized studies of experimental disclosure were collected and included in the present meta-analysis. Results of random effects analyses indicate that experimental disclosure is effective, with a positive and significant average r-effect size of .075. In addition, a number of moderators were identified.

PMID:
17073523
DOI:
10.1037/0033-2909.132.6.823
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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