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Fertil Steril. 2007 Feb;87(2):397-404. Epub 2006 Oct 24.

Expression of two-pore domain potassium channels in nonhuman primate sperm.

Author information

1
Washington National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Two-pore domain potassium channels (K(2P)) play integral roles in cell signaling pathways by modifying cell membrane resting potential. Here we describe the expression and function of K(2P) channels in nonhuman primate sperm.

DESIGN:

Experimental animal study, randomized blinded concentration-response experiments.

SETTING:

University-affiliated primate research center.

ANIMAL(S):

Male nonhuman primates.

INTERVENTION(S):

Western blot and immunofluorescent analysis of epididymal sperm samples. Kinematic measures (curvilinear velocity and lateral head displacement) and acrosome status were studied in epididymal sperm samples exposed to K(2P) agonist (docosahexaenoic acid) and antagonist (gadolinium).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Semiquantitative protein expression and cellular localization and quantitative changes in specific kinematic parameters and acrosome integrity.

RESULT(S):

Molecular analysis demonstrated expression and specific regional distribution of TRAAK, TREK-1, and TASK-2 in nonhuman primate sperm. Docosahexaenoic acid produced a concentration-dependent increase in curvilinear velocity (P<.0001) with concomitant concentration-dependent reductions in lateral head displacement (P=.005). Gadolinium reduced velocity measures (P<.01) without significantly affecting lateral head displacement.

CONCLUSION(S):

The results demonstrated expression and function of K(2P) potassium channels in nonhuman primate sperm for the first time. The unique, discrete distributions of K(2P) channels in nonhuman primate sperm suggest specific roles for this subfamily of ion channels in primate sperm function.

PMID:
17067589
PMCID:
PMC1852539
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2006.06.051
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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