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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Oct;14(10):1825-31.

Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students.

Author information

1
Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, #820, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA. WestDelia@uams.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To characterize sugar-sweetened beverage intake of college students.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

Undergraduates in an urban southern community campus were surveyed anonymously about sugared beverage consumption (soda, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, sweet ice tea) in the past month.

RESULTS:

Two hundred sixty-five undergraduates responded (66% women, 46% minority, 100% of volunteers solicited). Most students (95%) reported sugared beverage intake in the past month, and 65% reported daily intake. Men were more likely than women to report daily intake (74% vs. 61%, p = 0.035). Soda was the most common sugar-sweetened beverage. Black undergraduates reported higher sugared beverage intake than whites (p = 0.02), with 91% of blacks reporting sugar-sweetened fruit drink intake in the past month and 50% reporting daily consumption. Mean estimated caloric intake from combined types of sugar-sweetened beverages was significantly higher among black students than whites, 796 +/- 941 vs. 397 +/- 396 kcal/d (p = 0.0003); the primary source of sugar-sweetened beverage calories among blacks was sugared fruit drinks (556 +/- 918 kcal/d). Younger undergraduates reported significantly higher intake than older students (p = 0.025).

DISCUSSION:

Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among undergraduates is substantial and likely contributes considerable non-nutritive calories, which may contribute to weight gain. Black undergraduates may be particularly vulnerable due to higher sugared beverage intake. Obesity prevention interventions targeting reductions in sugar-sweetened beverages in this population merit consideration.

PMID:
17062813
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2006.210
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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