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Clin Infect Dis. 2006 Nov 15;43(10):1233-8. Epub 2006 Oct 10.

Community-acquired Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in adults.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Center of Infection and Immunity Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. m.c.brouwer@amc.uva.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Listeria monocytogenes is the third most common cause of bacterial meningitis.

METHODS:

We prospectively evaluated 30 episodes of community-acquired L. monocytogenes meningitis, confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid specimens, in a nationwide study in The Netherlands. Outcome was graded using the Glasgow outcome score; an unfavorable outcome was defined as a score of 1-4.

RESULTS:

We found 30 episodes of L. monocytogenes meningitis. All patients were immunocompromised or > 50 years old. In 19 (63%) of 30 patients, symptoms were present for > 24 h; in 8 patients (27%), symptoms were present for > or = 4 days. The classic triad of fever, neck stiffness, and change in mental status was present in 13 (43%) of 30 patients. An individual cerebrospinal fluid indicator of bacterial meningitis was present in 23 (77%) of 30 cases. Gram staining of cerebrospinal fluid samples revealed the causative organism in 7 (28%) of 25 cases. The initial antimicrobial therapy was amoxicillin based for 21 (70%) of 30 patients. The coverage of initial antimicrobial therapy was microbiologically inadequate for 9 (30%) of the patients. The mortality rate was 17% (5 of 30), and 8 (27%) of 30 patients experienced an unfavorable outcome. Inadequate initial antimicrobial therapy was not related to outcome.

CONCLUSIONS:

In contrast with previous reports, we found that patients with meningitis due to L. monocytogenes do not present with atypical clinical features; however, typical cerebrospinal fluid findings predictive for bacterial meningitis might be absent. A high proportion of patients received initial antimicrobial therapy that did not cover L. monocytogenes.

PMID:
17051485
DOI:
10.1086/508462
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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