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Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2006 Oct;132(10):1123-7.

Adenotonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea in obese children: effects on respiratory parameters and clinical outcome.

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1
Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Perth, Western Australia. shiner1@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the efficacy of adenotonsillar surgery on respiratory sleep parameters and avoiding continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in morbidly obese children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS).

DESIGN:

Retrospective.

SETTING:

Tertiary referral institution.

PATIENTS:

Children aged 2 to 18 years, with a body mass index (BMI) at or higher than the 95th percentile (adjusted for age and sex), undergoing adenotonsillar surgery for OSAS.

INTERVENTIONS:

Adenotonsillectomy.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Preoperative and postoperative respiratory disturbance index, oxygen saturation nadir, overall severity of OSAS (mild, moderate, or severe) and candidacy for CPAP treatment were assessed and compared. Variables such as age, severity of disease, adenotonsillar size, and BMI z scores were compared between responders and nonresponders to surgical treatment.

RESULTS:

A total of 19 patients with full preoperative and postoperative data for evaluation were identified. The median (SD) age was 78 months (53.3 months). The median (SD) BMI z score was 2.84 (0.94). Eighteen patients (95%) had OSAS preoperatively to warrant CPAP treatment. Surgery reduced the overall median (SD) respiratory disturbance index from 20.7 (24.5) to 7.3 (14.9) (P<.001) and improved the median (SD) oxygen saturation nadir from 77.5% (16.3%) to 88.5 (13.1%) (P<.01). A total of 7 patients (37%) were cured by surgery. Ten patients (53%) had postoperative disease of sufficient severity to require CPAP. Surgery obviated the need for further treatment in only 8 (44%) of the 18 patients with preoperative disease warranting CPAP. No differences were identified between responders and nonresponders to surgical treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adenotonsillar surgery improves sleep respiratory parameters in morbidly obese children with OSAS. Most patients have residual OSAS requiring further treatment.

PMID:
17043263
DOI:
10.1001/archotol.132.10.1123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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