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Arch Anim Nutr. 2006 Oct;60(5):390-401.

Influence of different fibre sources on digestibility and nitrogen and energy balances in growing pigs.

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1
Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to investigate how three different fibre sources, sugar beet pulp, soya bean hulls and pectin residue, constituting 15% of diets for growing pigs, influenced daily body gain, feed conversion, apparent faecal digestibility and nitrogen and energy balances. Eight castrated crossbreed pigs (30-80 kg live weight) were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin-square design with one control diet and three fibre containing diets. Daily body weight gain and feed conversion were not affected by the dietary treatments. The apparent faecal digestibility of organic matter (OM) and energy were significantly lower for the fibre diets (OM: 0.81-0.85; energy: 0.78-0.83) compared to the control diet (OM: 0.88; energy: 0.86). The apparent faecal digestibility of crude protein (CP) was lower for the fibre diets (0.71-0.78) compared to the control diet (0.83), although it was only significantly lower for the sugar beet pulp and pectin residue diets. The pectin residue diet, which contained the highest amount of dietary fibre, lignin and insoluble non-starch polysaccharides, had the lowest digestibility of OM, CP and energy. There was a tendency (p = 0.07) for a diet effect on retained nitrogen in proportion to digested nitrogen, where the sugar beet pulp and pectin residue diets had numerically the highest values. Heat production and retained energy in proportion to metabolizable energy intake were not affected by fibre inclusion. It was concluded that the inclusion of sugar beet pulp, soya bean hulls and pectin residue in diets for growing pigs decreased the apparent faecal digestibility and in the diets with sugar beet pulp and pectin residue higher utilization of digested nitrogen for retention compensated for the lower amount of digested nitrogen.

PMID:
17036748
DOI:
10.1080/17450390600884385
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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