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Org Biomol Chem. 2006 Sep 21;4(18):3383-91. Epub 2006 Jun 22.

DNA nanomachines and nanostructures involving quadruplexes.

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1
Laboratoire de Biophysique, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle USM503, INSERM U565, CNRS UMR 5153, 43 rue Cuvier, 75231, Paris cedex 05, France. faucon@mnhn.fr

Abstract

DNA is an attractive component for molecular recognition, because of its self-assembly properties. Its three-dimensional structure can differ markedly from the classical double helix. For example, DNA or RNA strands carrying guanine or cytosine stretches associate into four-stranded structures called G-quadruplexes or i-DNA, respectively. Since 2002, several groups have described nanomachines that take advantage of this structural polymorphism. We first introduce the unusual structures that are involved in these devices (i.e., i-DNA and G-quadruplexes) and then describe the opening and closing steps that allow cycling. A quadruplex-duplex molecular machine is then presented in detail, together with the rules that govern its formation, its opening/closing kinetics and the various technical and physico-chemical parameters that play a role in the efficiency of this device. Finally, we review the few examples of nanostructures that involve quadruplexes.

PMID:
17036128
DOI:
10.1039/b605739j
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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