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J Occup Environ Med. 2006 Oct;48(10):1005-13.

Depression and pesticide exposures in female spouses of licensed pesticide applicators in the agricultural health study cohort.

Author information

1
Colorado Injury Control Research Center, Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA. cbeseler@lamar,colostate.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This nested case-control study evaluated the association between depression and pesticide exposure among women.

METHODS:

The study population included 29,074 female spouses of private pesticide applicators enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study between 1993 and 1997. Cases were women who had physician-diagnosed depression requiring medication. Lifetime pesticide use was categorized as never mixed/applied pesticides, low exposure (up to 225 days), high exposure (>225 days), and a history of diagnosed pesticide poisoning.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for state, age, race, off-farm work, alcohol, cigarette smoking, physician visits, and solvent exposure, depression was significantly associated with a history of pesticide poisoning (odds ratio [OR] = 3.26; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.72-6.19) but not low (OR = 1.09; CI = 0.91-1.31) or high (OR = 1.09; 95% CI = 0.91-1.31) cumulative pesticide exposure.

CONCLUSION:

Pesticide poisoning may contribute to risk of depression.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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