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J Neurosurg. 1991 Feb;74(2):236-42.

Dorsal root ganglionectomy for failed back surgery syndrome: a 5-year follow-up study.

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1
Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Abstract

Dorsal root ganglionectomy has been suggested as a method for the treatment of chronic intractable radicular pain, with theoretical advantages over dorsal rhizotomy, which does not interrupt ventral root afferents. The indications for these procedures in patients with persistent pain following lumbosacral spine surgery are not well established. Long-term results have been reported infrequently, and no published series has a mean follow-up period of more than 30 months. The authors have reviewed their experience with a series of 13 patients with failed back surgery syndrome, in whom dorsal root ganglionectomy was performed. Patients were selected on the basis of clinical presentation and diagnostic root blocks suggesting a monoradicular pain syndrome. Follow-up data were obtained at a mean of 5.5 years following dorsal root ganglionectomy. Follow-up interviews to assess outcome were conducted by a disinterested third party. Treatment "success" (at least 50% sustained relief of pain and patient satisfaction with the result) was recorded in two patients at 2 years after surgery and in none at 5.5 years. Equivocal success (at least 50% relief, without clearcut patient satisfaction) was recorded in one patient at 2 and at 5.5 years postoperatively. Improvements in activities of daily living were recorded in a minority of patients. Loss of sensory and motor function was reported frequently by patients. A minority of patients had reduced or eliminated analgesic intake. These results suggest that dorsal root ganglionectomy has a limited role in the management of failed back surgery syndrome, and that methods to select patients to receive this procedure should be refined or alternative approaches should be considered.

PMID:
1703228
DOI:
10.3171/jns.1991.74.2.0236
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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