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Gut. 2007 Apr;56(4):497-503. Epub 2006 Oct 6.

Ulcerative colitis: no rise in mortality in a European-wide population based cohort 10 years after diagnosis.

Author information

1
Sörlandet Hospital Arendal, Department of Medicine, Section for Gastroenterology, Arendal, Norway. olehoeie@online.no

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Population based studies have revealed varying mortality for patients with ulcerative colitis but most have described patients from limited geographical areas who were diagnosed before 1990.

AIMS:

To assess overall mortality in a European cohort of patients with ulcerative colitis, 10 years after diagnosis, and to investigate national ulcerative colitis related mortality across Europe.

METHODS:

Mortality 10 years after diagnosis was recorded in a prospective European-wide population based cohort of patients with ulcerative colitis diagnosed in 1991-1993 from nine centres in seven European countries. Expected mortality was calculated from the sex, age and country specific mortality in the WHO Mortality Database for 1995-1998. Standardised mortality ratios (SMR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.

RESULTS:

At follow-up, 661 of 775 patients were alive with a median follow-up duration of 123 months (107-144). A total of 73 deaths (median follow-up time 61 months (1-133)) occurred compared with an expected 67. The overall mortality risk was no higher: SMR 1.09 (95% CI 0.86 to 1.37). Mortality by sex was SMR 0.92 (95% CI 0.65 to 1.26) for males and SMR 1.39 (95% CI 0.97 to 1.93) for females. There was a slightly higher risk in older age groups. For disease specific mortality, a higher SMR was found only for pulmonary disease. Mortality by European region was SMR 1.19 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.53) for the north and SMR 0.82 (95% CI 0.45-1.37) for the south.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher mortality was not found in patients with ulcerative colitis 10 years after disease onset. However, a significant rise in SMR for pulmonary disease, and a trend towards an age related rise in SMR, was observed.

PMID:
17028127
PMCID:
PMC1856843
DOI:
10.1136/gut.2006.101519
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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