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Surg Endosc. 2006 Nov;20(11):1662-70. Epub 2006 Oct 5.

Laparoscopic fundoplication: a 10-year learning curve.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Larisa, Larisa, Greece.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) has become the most common surgical treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Controversies still exist regarding the operative technique and the durability of the procedure.

METHODS:

A retrospective study of 808 patients undergoing 838 LNF for GERD at a tertiary referral center was undertaken. Demographic, perioperative, and follow-up data had been entered onto the unit database.

RESULTS:

During a median follow-up period of 60 months (range, 2-120 months), heartburn decreased to 3% of the patients (19/645) and regurgitation to 2% (11/582) (p < 0.01). Respiratory symptoms improved in 69 (85%) of 81 patients (p < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative dysphagia was unaffected by the use of an intraesophageal bougie (odds ratio [OR], 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-1.64; p = 0.41) or division of the short gastric vessels (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.42-1.07; p = 0.72). In the immediate postoperative period, the incidence of abdominal symptoms increased by 10% (p < 0.01) and dysphagia by 16% (p < 0.01). After 10 postoperative years, only 3% (30/484) were found to have abdominal symptoms, whereas the incidence of dysphagia declined to zero.

CONCLUSION:

The findings show that LNF is a safe and effective procedure with long-term durability. Abdominal symptoms and dysphagia are the principal postoperative complaints, which improve with time. Personal preference should dictate the use of a bougie, division of the short gastric vessels, or both.

PMID:
17024541
DOI:
10.1007/s00464-005-0571-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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