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Br J Cancer. 2006 Nov 6;95(9):1291-5. Epub 2006 Oct 3.

Family history of breast cancer and young age at diagnosis of breast cancer increase risk of second primary malignancies in women: a population-based cohort study.

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  • 1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, PO Box 281, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Michaela.Prochazka@ki.se

Abstract

Among 152 600 breast cancer patients diagnosed during 1958-2000, there was a 22% increased risk of developing a second primary non-breast malignancy (standardised incidence ratio (SIR)=1.22; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19-1.24). The highest risk was seen for connective tissue cancer (SIR=1.78; 95% CI: 1.49-2.10). Increased risks were noted among women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50. Oesophagus cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma showed six- and four-fold higher risks, respectively, in women with a family history of breast cancer compared to those without in the > or =10-year follow-up period.

PMID:
17024122
PMCID:
PMC2360570
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6603404
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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