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J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2006 Oct;20(5):684-90. Epub 2006 Jun 5.

Effects of sevoflurane on biomechanical markers of hepatic and renal dysfunction after coronary artery surgery.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospital, Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a total intravenous and a volatile anesthetic regimen on biochemical markers of hepatic and renal dysfunction after coronary artery surgery.

DESIGN:

Prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical study.

SETTING:

University hospital, single institutional.

PARTICIPANTS:

Three hundred twenty patients undergoing elective coronary artery surgery were divided into 2 different anesthetic protocols: propofol group (n = 160) and sevoflurane group (n = 160).

INTERVENTIONS:

Hemodynamic data were registered before the start of surgery, before the start of CPB, 15 minutes after the end of CPB, at arrival in the intensive care unit, and 6 and 12 hours after arrival in the intensive care unit. Serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and serum creatinine concentrations were measured before surgery, at arrival in the intensive care unit, and after 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Postoperative levels of serum SGOT, SGPT, and LDH increased transiently in both anesthetic groups, but the increase was significantly lower in the sevoflurane group compared with the propofol group. Creatinine levels remained largely unchanged in both groups.

CONCLUSION:

Postoperative biochemical markers of hepatic dysfunction were lower with a sevoflurane-based anesthetic regimen in patients undergoing coronary artery surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

PMID:
17023289
DOI:
10.1053/j.jvca.2006.02.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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