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Am J Sports Med. 2007 Jan;35(1):118-26. Epub 2006 Oct 4.

Clinical examination and ultrasound of self-reported snapping hip syndrome in elite ballet dancers.

Author information

1
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G2A2, Canada. paul.winston@utoronto.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although snapping hip syndrome is commonly reported in ballet dancers, the prevalence, impact, and underlying mechanism of this condition have not been formally studied within a cohort of dancers.

PURPOSE:

To determine the prevalence, associated factors, and mechanisms of snapping hip and to investigate self-reported snapping with physical and ultrasound examination.

STUDY DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.

METHODS:

A snapping hip questionnaire was completed by 87 unselected elite ballet dancers at 2 institutions. Twenty-six of the dancers (50 hips) who were able to voluntarily snap their hips were selected from this group for further physical examination by 2 clinicians to determine whether there was a palpable snap, and each underwent an ultrasound examination of his or her hips.

RESULTS:

Ninety-one percent of dancers reported snapping hip, of which most (80%) had bilateral symptoms. Fifty-eight percent had pain associated with the snap, and 7% had taken time off dance because of this condition. Sixty percent of the dancers could voluntarily snap their hip. One or more of 3 dance movements elicited the snapping in 81%. The clinicians could palpate 46 of the 50 self-reported snapping hips. Ultrasound showed a snapping iliopsoas tendon in 59% of the hips and the iliotibial band snapping in 4%. In one third of cases, ultrasound was not helpful in identifying the cause of the snapping.

CONCLUSION:

Snapping hip is extremely common in ballet dancers. Some dancers have significant pain, yet many are asymptomatic. Self-reported snapping is likely to be palpable by the clinician. Iliotibial band snapping is evident by physical examination and ultrasound. Iliopsoas snapping was most common and required ultrasonic confirmation.

PMID:
17021311
DOI:
10.1177/0363546506293703
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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