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Free Radic Biol Med. 2006 Oct 15;41(8):1266-71. Epub 2006 Jul 15.

One-electron oxidation of catecholamines generates free radicals with an in vitro toxicity correlating with their lifetime.

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1
Department of Biomedicine, Section for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Bergen, Jonas Lies Vei 91, N-5009 Bergen, Norway.

Abstract

One-electron oxidation of dopamine by ferricyanide generates a highly reactive free radical intermediate that inactivates the V-type H(+)-ATPase proton pump in catecholamine storage vesicles, i.e., the driving force in both the vesicular uptake and the storage of catecholamines, in a cell-free in vitro model system at pH 7.0. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that a radical with g=2.0045, formed by this oxidation, was relatively long-lived (t(1/2) obs=79 s at pH 6.5 and 25 degrees C). Experimental evidence is presented that the observed radical most likely represents dopamine semiquinone free radical, although an o-quinone free radical cannot be ruled out. Oxidation of noradrenaline and adrenaline by ferricyanide generated similar isotropic radicals, but of shorter half-lives (i.e., 43 and 5.3 s, respectively), and the efficacy of inactivation of the H(+)-ATPase correlated with the half-life of the respective catecholamine free radical (i.e., dopamine >noradrenaline>>adrenaline). Thus, the generation of relatively long-lived semiquinone free radicals, although at low concentrations, in dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons may represent a common mechanism of cytotoxicity linked to neurodegeneration of the respective neurons related to Parkinson disease.

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