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Type-2 dominant cytokine gene expression following hepatic surgery.

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1
Division of Surgical Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, 4501, X Street, Suite #3010, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE:

Hemorrhage and ischemic liver injuries associated with hepatic resection are thought to play a role in postoperative complications, possibly through altered cytokine production. The current study was performed to investigate the effects of hepatectomy on cytokine gene expression.

METHODS:

We collected blood preoperatively, at completion of operation, and on postoperative days 1 and 5 from ten patients undergoing hepatic resection. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells were evaluated with real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for gene expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10), proinflammatory cytokines (interferon-gamma [IFNgamma], IL-15, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFalpha], and chemokines regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted [RANTES], macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha [MIP-1alpha], [MIP-1beta]). Wilcoxon Rank and paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis.

RESULTS:

Immediately following hepatectomy there was a significant (31.4 +/- 60.5-fold; P < 0.05) increase in IL-10 gene expression that was sustained until the first postoperative day. In contrast, there was a significant downregulation (38 +/- 71 eight fold lower than preoperative; P < 0.05) of IFNgamma gene expression on day 1. By postoperative day 5, the changes in gene transcript levels of both IL-10 and IFNgamma had returned to the preoperative baselines. This contrasting change in IL-10 and IFNgamma gene expression in response to hepatic resection was statistically significant (P = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

Hepatectomy elicits an imbalance towards the immunosuppressive type-2 cytokine profile in the early postoperative period. Measurement of cytokine gene transcripts following hepatic resection may have predictive value for clinical outcome, and deserves further study.

PMID:
17013720
DOI:
10.1007/s00534-006-1103-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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