Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Oct 3;48(7):1304-9. Epub 2006 Sep 12.

Vessel size and outcome after coronary drug-eluting stent placement: results from a large cohort of patients treated with sirolimus- or paclitaxel-eluting stents.

Author information

1
Deutsches Herzzentrum, Technische Universität, Munich, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study sought to investigate the influence of vessel size on the outcomes of patients after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation.

BACKGROUND:

There are no dedicated studies on the influence of vessel size on the outcomes of patients treated with different DES.

METHODS:

The study population was composed of 2,058 consecutive patients who received sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) or paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES). Patients were grouped into tertiles according to vessel size (<2.41 mm in the lower tertile, 2.41 to 2.84 mm in the middle tertile, and >2.84 mm in the upper tertile). The primary end point was target lesion revascularization (TLR). Secondary end points were binary angiographic restenosis and the composite of death or myocardial infarction.

RESULTS:

Vessel size did not influence the composite end point of death and myocardial infarction. The TLR rates were higher among patients in the lower tertile (12.1%) as compared with the middle (8.4%) and upper (8.0%) tertiles (p = 0.02). In a multivariate analysis, vessel size emerged an independent predictor of TLR (p = 0.009). The model showed also a significant interaction between DES type and vessel size regarding TLR (p = 0.008). There was a significant difference in TLR rates among patients treated with SESs (8.6%) and PESs (16.4%) in the lower tertile (p = 0.002), but not in the middle and upper tertiles.

CONCLUSIONS:

The influence of vessel size on restenosis is related to the specific DES used, with SESs providing better outcomes than PESs in small but not in large coronary vessels.

PMID:
17010786
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2006.05.068
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center