Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Rehabil. 2006 Oct;20(10):847-59.

Improving the rehabilitative management of client sexual health concerns after neurological disability: evaluation of a staff sexuality training programme in New Zealand.

Author information

1
Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit, Liverpool Health Service, Sydney, Australia. grahame.simpson@swsahs.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effectiveness of a staff sexuality training programme as a means of improving the rehabilitative management of client sexual health concerns after neurological disability.

DESIGN:

A prospective controlled pre- and posttest evaluation design with six-month follow-up.

SUBJECTS:

Seventy-four multidisciplinary rehabilitation and disability staff who attended a two-day workshop, and a control group of 25 staff members who did not receive the training.

SETTING:

Two workshops were held at major rehabilitation centres in the North and South Islands of New Zealand respectively.

MAIN MEASURES:

The Sex Attitude Scale, as well as three purpose-designed measures including an objective knowledge test, a self-rating inventory of skills and clinical activity, and a single-item measure of the degree of staff comfort.

RESULTS:

Workshop participants showed significant increases in knowledge, skills and comfort comparing pre-to post-workshop scores. A number of these gains were maintained at the six-month follow-up. There was an associated increase in the level of reported staff activity in addressing patient/client sexual health concerns in the six months to follow-up, compared to a similar time period preceding the workshop. In contrast, the control group had similar pre-workshop scores to the workshop participants, but recorded no increase on the measures, or in their level of reported activity, at the six-month follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

The programme showed initial promise as an effective intervention in upgrading the capacity of staff working in rehabilitation and disability agencies to address the sexual health concerns of their patients/clients.

PMID:
17008337
DOI:
10.1177/0269215506072180
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center