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World J Gastroenterol. 2006 Sep 28;12(36):5772-9.

Risk factors of gastric cancer specific for tumor location and histology in Cali, Colombia.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544, Japan.

Abstract

AIM:

To examine histology- and tumor-location specific risk factors of gastric cancer (GC).

METHODS:

This was a case-control study. The study subjects were 216 GC patients newly diagnosed during the period 2000-2002 and 431 controls selected from non-cancer patients matching in age, gender, and hospital. We obtained information on lifestyles, dietary habits, and others by a questionnaire.

RESULTS:

The subjects who were not eldest among his/her siblings were at a slightly elevated GC risk (OR 1.3; 95% CI 0.8-2.0). Salting meals before tasting was related to an increased GC risk (OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.6- 7.3). Frequent consumptions of fruits (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-1.0) and vegetables (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-1.0) were related to decreased GC risks. On the other hand, frying foods (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.0-3.6) and cooking with coal (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.3-2.6) were related to increased GC risks. Neither Laurenos histological classification (intestinal and diffuse types) nor tumor location significantly affected those associations except birth order. The subjects who were not eldest among his/her siblings had an increased risk of GCs in the distal and middle thirds, and their ORs were 1.7 (95% CI 1.0-2.8) and 1.9 (95% CI 0.8-4.3), respectively. The corresponding OR in the upper third stomach was 0.3 (95% CI 0.1-0.9). The differences of those three ORs were statistically significant (P = 0.010).

CONCLUSION:

The present study shows that birth order, salt intake, consumption of fruits and vegetables, the type of cooking, and cigarette smoking are related to GC risk. In histology and tumor-location specific analyses, non-eldest person among their siblings is related to an increased GC risk in the distal and middle thirds of the stomach, and is related to a decreased GC risk in the cardia.

PMID:
17007041
PMCID:
PMC4100656
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v12.i36.5772
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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