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Clin Rehabil. 2006 Sep;20(9):756-72.

Goal setting as an outcome measure: A systematic review.

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1
Guildford and Waverley NHS Primary Care Trust, Guildford, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Goal achievement has been considered to be an important measure of outcome by clinicians working with patients in physical and neurological rehabilitation settings. This systematic review was undertaken to examine the reliability, validity and sensitivity of goal setting and goal attainment scaling approaches when used with working age and older people.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

To review the reliability, validity and sensitivity of both goal setting and goal attainment scaling when employed as an outcome measure within a physical and neurological working age and older person rehabilitation environment, by examining the research literature covering the 36 years since goal-setting theory was proposed.

METHODS:

Data sources included a computer-aided literature search of published studies examining the reliability, validity and sensitivity of goal setting/goal attainment scaling, with further references sourced from articles obtained through this process.

MAIN FINDINGS:

There is strong evidence for the reliability, validity and sensitivity of goal attainment scaling. Empirical support was found for the validity of goal setting but research demonstrating its reliability and sensitivity is limited.

CONCLUSIONS:

Goal attainment scaling appears to be a sound measure for use in physical rehabilitation settings with working age and older people. Further work needs to be carried out with goal setting to establish its reliability and sensitivity as a measurement tool.

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PMID:
17005500
DOI:
10.1177/0269215506070793
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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