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J Thromb Haemost. 2006 Dec;4(12):2547-52. Epub 2006 Sep 26.

Platelet function in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) predicts recurrent ACS.

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1
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Platelet hyperfunction contributes to acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Thus, we hypothesized that platelet function under high shear stress predicts recurrent ACS during long-term follow-up of ACS patients.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Consecutive ACS patients (n = 208) were prospectively followed-up for an average of 28 months. Platelet function was measured with the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100; Dade Behring, Marburg, Germany) at baseline for collagen/adenosine diphosphate closure times (CADP-CT) and for collagen/epinephrine closure times (CEPI-CT) after infusion of a uniform dose of 250 mg aspirin.

RESULTS:

Of the conventional risk factors, only the prevalence of diabetes was higher in ACS patients with re-events. However, use of clopidogrel and use of beta blockers were also slightly lower in patients with re-events (P < 0.05). The unadjusted risk hazard ratio (HR) for re-events was 3.3 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.4-7.4; P = 0.005] in those patients with the shortest CADP-CT values (lowest quartile). Similarly, the risk was 2.0-fold higher (95% CI: 1.1-3.6; P = 0.02) in ACS patients with CEPI-CT < 300 s as compared with CEPI-CT >or = 300 s. Inclusion of diabetes, clopidogrel and beta blockers in a multivariate Cox regression model enhanced the predictive value of CEPI-CT (HR: 2.7). Inclusion of von Willebrand factor levels did not alter the HR for recurrent ACS (HR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1-5.2; P = 0.03) for CEPI-CT < 300 s, but reduced the HR for CADP-CT (HR: 2.8, 95% CI: 0.8-9.8; P = 0.11).

CONCLUSION:

Shortened CT values reflect biologically relevant platelet hyperfunction in patients with ACS because they predict recurrent ACS.

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